SPORTS ARTICLES

AARON HERNANDEZ HAD CTE, IS THE NFL TO BLAME?
- |SI.COM

Yesterday, the BU CTE Center announced that doctors found an advanced form of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in the brain of a football player who died at 27. The fact that the brain was Aaron Hernandez‘s, a former Patriots star who was convicted of murder before committing suicide in his jail cell, made the discovery notable—but that’s not what makes it scary.

REDSKINS QUARTERBACK KIRK COUSINS SOUGHT HELP TO MAKE HIS BRAIN PERFORM BETTER

From the moment the Washington Redskins drafted him three rounds behind Robert Griffin III in 2012, Michigan State’s Kirk Cousins was reduced to a fallback plan. He was the football equivalent of a college applicant’s “safety school” or the friend who fills in as a prom date after true love fails.

NICK BUONICONTI WILL DONATE BRAIN TO
CONCUSSION RESEARCH

As he pledged to donate his brain to scientists studying the long-term effects of repeated head hits, Nick Buoniconti, one of football’s most famous and revered players, lashed out at the N.F.L. for failing players and not doing enough to support research.

CTE IN 99% OF FORMER NFL PLAYERS’ BRAINS IN
NEW STUDY

A new study by Boston University researcher Dr. Ann McKee examined the brains of 202 deceased football players and found that 110 of the 111 brains of former NFL players had chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The results were published the Journal of the American Medical Association.

FOOTBALL AND CTE: IN NEW STUDY, NEARLY ALL DONATED NFL PLAYER BRAINS FOUND TO HAVE CTE : NPR

“As the country starts to get back into its most popular professional team sport, there is a reminder of how dangerous football can be. An updated study published Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association on football players and the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy reveals a striking result among NFL players

111 NFL BRAINS. ALL BUT ONE HAD C.T.E.
– THE NEW YORK TIMES

“Dr. Ann McKee, a neuropathologist, has examined the brains of 202 deceased football players. A broad survey of her findings was published on Tuesday in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

“THEY BASICALLY RESET MY BRAIN” |
BY JERMICHAEL FINLEY

“I was strapped to a stretcher in the back of an ambulance, still in full uniform. Shoulder pads, helmet — everything except for my face mask. The trainers had taken that off while I was still lying on the field in front of 81,000 people at Lambeau. When we got to the hospital, the first room the paramedics took me to was freezing cold and the walls looked all rough and unpainted.

KURT ANGLE GRAPPLES HIS TOUGHEST OPPONENT: DRUG ADDICTION | THE FIX

“I’ve put my body through a lot of hell and that withdrawal was the most painful, tortuous experience I’ve ever had.”

An interview with Kurt Angle about the Anglestrong initiative and his own recovery

NFL & CONCUSSIONS: FIRST EVIDENCE OF BRAIN INJURY IN LIVING EX-PLAYERS | TIME.COM

“For years, the NFL has stood by the contention that there is no direct evidence proving that playing football is linked to traumatic brain injury (TBI) or the devastating brain disorder chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is increasingly being diagnosed in former players. And they were right, in a sense. The evidence that existed was circumstantial, and most involved finding signs of TBI in deceased players, making it impossible to know for sure whether their time in the league was responsible or whether other factors played a role.

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